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Metal rubles and kopeks - modern coins of the Russian Federation

  • Name:
  • Monetary unit:
  • Capital:
  • Area:
  • Language:

  • the Country code:
  • Russian Federation

  • the Russian ruble
  • Moscow
  • of 17 075 200 sq. km
  • Russian (state), numerous local dialects
  • RU (RUS) 643

Monetary unit of the Russian Federation is the ruble which consists of 100 kopeks. In monetary circulation there are coins of denomination of 1, 5, 10, 50 kopeks and 1, 2, 5, 10 rubles.

After the existence termination Soviet Union , in the Russian Federation in 1992 coins of denomination in 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 rubles have been manufactured. Coins of 1 and 5 rubles have been rapped out from a brass-plated steel, a coin of 10 and 20 rubles from a Copper-Nickel, and a coin of 50 and 100 rubles bimetallic (Aluminum-Bronze and copper-nickel-zinc alloys). In 1993 the material of coins 10 to 20 rubles has been changed to a Nickel-plated steel, and a material of 50 rubles have changed for a brass-plated steel in 1995.

Memorable coins Manufactured during this period in one ruble were almost identical on the size and weight to coins of 5 Swiss francs (for the sum apprx. 3 / US $4). For this reason the Russian tourists used often rouble coins for a deceit of the computerised penny-in-the-slot machines in Switzerland.

Now coins of 1 and 5 kopeks are seldom used (especially 1 kopek) because of their small consumer ability, and in certain cases can be not accepted in shops. All Russian coins of a modern series have started to be manufactured in 1998 in spite of the fact that on some 1997 costs a date of issue. Since 2000 bimetallic circulating memorable coins of 10 rubles are entered into the circulation. In 2008 the Bank of Russia has suggested to withdraw coins of 1 and 5 kopeks from the circulation and to approximate all prices to 10 kopeks, but this offer has not been realised in 2010. The material of coins 1, 2 and 5 rubles has been changed to a Nickel-plated steel in the second quarter 2009. Since October, 2009 the new 10-rouble coin from a brass-plated steel began to be manufactured, and 10-rouble notes will be introduced by 2012. Bimetallic coins of 10 rubles still are in circulation. A series of circulating Olympic memorable coins of 25 rubles will start to be manufactured in 2011. These coins will be produced from a Copper-Nickel.

The Bank of Russia manufactures also other memorable coins in a range from 1 to 10000 rubles.

Nominal value: 5 kopeks
Stamping: 2003
the Material: the Steel covered with a Copper-Nickel
the Note:
the Obverse of 5 kopeks of the Russian Federation the Reverse of 5 kopeks of the Russian Federation
Nominal value: 10 kopeks
Stamping: 2003
the Material: the Brass
the Note:
the Obverse of 10 kopeks of the Russian Federation the Reverse of 10 kopeks of the Russian Federation
Nominal value: 2 rubles
Stamping: 2006
the Material: the Copper-Nickel
the Note:
the Obverse 2 rubles of the Russian Federation the Reverse 2 rubles of the Russian Federation

Notes the Russian Federation

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